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A Collective Tribute
R i c h a r d P o c h i n k o
1946 - 1989
Richard Pochinko was raised on a farm in Lockport, Manitoba, the youngest of three brothers and two sisters. His father
died when he was eight months old. His mother, Annie Napora and his eldest brother Jim and sister Christine maintained
the household. It was as if he had two mothers. When he was a child, he would go in the barn and make miniature stages
and circuses, and fill them with tiny actors and performers.
He studied clown technique with Jacques Lecoq in Paris, but found the European tradition authoritarian and confining. Back
in North America, on the West Coast, he encountered a spirit-guide, Jonsmith, who gave him a perspective on mask from
the Native tradition that few people, particularly non-Indians, know. These two traditions came together to form the
Pochinko technique. At the core of this approach is the idea that if we can face all the directions of ourselves, North, South,
East, West, Up, Down, we can only laugh - at the beauty and wonder that is in us.
Richard first started to teach these ideas at the National Arts Centre, but, after a while, he and AnnSkinner decided to set up
a studio where they could do things their own way. And so the Theatre Resource Centre was born, with a dual mandate: to
teach and to develop new work. Now, under artistic director Ian Wallace, the TRC has celebrated its sixteenth year. Its
influence has been felt throughout Canadian theatre.
As well as being a teacher, for which he was best known, Richard was a very fine director. Part of the reason that this is
less known is that he gave so freely, and rarely took complete credit for the productions that he worked on. Many actors
and performers would come to him to help develop their work, bringing what was often only the germ of an idea. Richard
would pull the work out of them, shape it, help design it, often light and stage manage it and direct it in workshops. Then, in
many cases, he would say, "There. I've done what I can. It's yours now." And he would go on to the next new project.
discovered a new identity. It was Michel Tremblay's era. Richard contributed to the birth of a new Montreal theatre.
Together with Debra Silver, Dominique Fecteau, and Nion (Ian Wallace) they transformed an old, decrepit bar near
St-Laurent street into a cabaret-theatre. It's name? "Les Foufounes Electriques" There, as Derido Productions they held the
Montreal premiere of the play Nion, The Birth of a Clown. To this day, the location still has the reputation for being
avant-garde.
Richard was wise, perceptive, and seer. He was able to differentiate between bilingualism and biculturalism, between
nationalism and universality. He adopted the Quebecois culture by offering workshops in french at Linda Mancini's studio
among others. If the language got in the way, he resorted to mime. He touched so many among us there. His boundless
energy, so contagious, saved many a life.                       Gabriel Manseau & Ron Weiss
On April 29 of the year Richard was
dying, not knowing how to
communicate my distress and
helplessness, I said, "Richard, I am
drowning, it is dark and there is a
storm. I don"t see an island on the
horizon and I am scared." Richard
replied, "Its easy, Gabriel. All you
have to do is create your own
island." His smile was universal. He
helped us climb out of the abyss of
hopelessness toward a new
confidence.         
 Gabriel Manseau
The first thing about Richard that I remember is the light. Purely and simply the space between and around us was filled with light.
For me our meeting was an awakening, and instantaneous recognition of a light brother. From then on I was immersed in a world of
emotions, of love and tears, and laughter, and the theatre. The theatre. That was Richard's life and yet his vision went on beyond.  
Once Richard spoke in his sleep of being in a spaceship along with others, some that we knew, some we had yet to meet. As we
flew over the earth we saw people. at first he thought we were waving. As we came closer, he gasped, "No, they're trying to get out,
they are all inside glass tubes struggling to get out. Our mission is to release them, to break down the glass and let them free."  
This became Richard's work: helping people to release themselves from the ego armour of fear.  He freed us to face our essential
uniqueness and encouraged us to love and celebrate it. He called it the clown.                                

Nion (Ian A. Wallace), clown, theatre, & visual artist
The community of Native actors working in the Toronto area today received a big boost from Mr. Pochinko, not only in terms
of their training as actors, but in terms as well of commitment to theatre as an art.
Tomson Highway, playwright
Richard said that he started each morning with a dance of joy so that no matter what happened during the day, that joy
would return to him somewhere. Since I started my clown work with Richard two years ago he has returned to me almost
every day.
Michael Harms, clown, actor
I decided I didn’t like Richard Pochinko even before I met him. He was the handsome blond guy who was always surrounded
by eager, adoring faces. But then I took a class from him and realized that he was a teacher of genius. He was also a great
human being, and eventually my dear friend. I miss him very much.
 Marc Connors, actor, late singer with "the Nylons"
Richard celebrated the edge of risk.             Jan Kudelka (Performer, Playwright)
Knowing, loving, and working with Richard gave me immeasurable gifts, the greatest being in my own creative imagination.
Since the years of Clown work in the mid 70s, my focus in theatre became exclusively musical and compositional, direction
which Richard very much encouraged. What I had learned from Richard completely permeates my approach to musical
scoring - an uncanny sense of trusting my first impulses, an intuitive understanding of text, atmosphere, coloration and
intent. Not a day goes by in my musical work that does not draw on his rich legacy. He taught by example, friendship, and
inspired instruction, the art of making manifest the dream. He is with me always.
Marsha Coffey (Composer, Musician)
He brought out from its hiding place within me my joy of playing, and let me share it with the world.
Cheryl Cashman, clown, director
Richard gave me a new perspective on the world. He looked at what a person was, unencumbered by expectation and
judgement. And he respected and celebrated their want and desires. He was also a very private man, and I learned much
about being alone from him.
Fiona Griffiths, dancer
Meeting Richard in 1983 opened for me a whole new world - The world of Theatre. It was like him taking me by the hand and
guiding me through all the aspects of theatre starting with clowning, then characterization, both as a performer (in
Temptonga) and as a director (by workshopping my ideas and helping me to realize them).   ";Ida - follow your instincts."
This is the strongest guiding point he left me with. He seemed to be able to take the gifts we have and make them grow. He
helped each person find their unique creative gift. I think about him every day. Richard sitting in the old red comfy studio
chair like a throne - his head back, eyes crying, a rough sound ringing in the studio for a brief moment, then eyes up,
twinkling, ears bright red, anticipating the next fantastic thing.
Ida Carnevali, actor, director
Waving Goodbye to Someone you Love Ian Wallace
"Light the first light of evening, as in a room
In which we rest and, for small reason, think
The world imagined is the ultimate good."
Theatre Resource Centre is the physical manifestation of a dream started by Richard Pochinko and Anne Skinner. Having
worked in traditional theatre for many seasons both found themselves unfulfilled, something very basic was missing.
Because of the way things were geared to the continuous mounting and striking of productions, they felt the need to step
outside and begin again from the heart. Thus the TRC was founded "to provide a safe environment for the exploration of
new approaches to individual creativity and the discovery of new theatrical forms." That was in Ottawa in 1975.
I met Richard in Montreal in 1967. He was one of 12 stage managers at Expo Theatre and I was a grade 7 teacher from
Edmonton. Little did I know at the time that I was about to embark on a roller coaster ride of monumental extremes. The
first thing about Richard that I remember is the light. Purely and simply the space between and round us was filled with
light. For me our meeting was an awakening, an instantaneous recognition of a light brother. From then on I was immersed
in a world of emotions, love and tears, and laughter, and the theatre. The theatre. That was Richard's life and yet his vision
went on beyond.
In 1969, while working at Neptune theatre in Halifax, Richard spoke in his sleep of being in a spaceship along with others,
some that we knew, some we had yet to meet. As we flew over the earth we saw people, at first he thought were waving.
As we came closer, he gasped, "No, they're trying to get out, they  are all inside glass tubes struggling to get out. Our
mission is to release them, to break down the glass and let them free."
This became Richard's work, helping people to free themselves. To let go of images, fears, tensions, blocks, negativity.
From his studies of mask with Jacques Le Coq in Paris, and through Jah-smeh (Jonsmith), his shaman guide on the west
coast, he developed a series of exercises which have become the teaching of the TRC. Exercises requiring deep honesty
like Return to Childhood, and Waving Good-bye to Someone You Love. Over the years he touched and influenced the lives
and careers of thousands. From the high school students who experienced our shows and workshops for the Theatre Hour
Company to the lawyers, therapists story-tellers, artists and performers who have faced themselves in six directions and
gone through the masks. The gift that he gave to so many of us is like a mirror. He led us to face our essential uniqueness
and encouraged us to love and celebrate it. He called it the clown.
I write this in celebration of a clown, a remarkable man, to unleash his spirit on another adventure and to assure that many
more will continue waving good-bye to someone they love. Good-bye by friend.
Ian Wallace in memory of Richard Pochinko 1946 - 1989.
(Impact - Fall 1989) (Wallace, 1989: pg 11)